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Thursday, April 26, 2012

Just Like An Ink Blot


Nobody is perfect.  This is a common adage which applies to all of us.
We are living in this imperfect world with imperfect people. All of us have struggles in life though in different degree. However, the imperfections of an individual does not make him a lesser being- at least it shouldn't be the case. But we cannot deny the fact that there is one who just cannot stand with the imperfections of the other. And that is inevitable. There are people who set standards that should be followed AND we ought to follow such standard. Failure to comply is tantamount to a certain consequences. We call it as an act of discipline. The word "discipline" according to WordWeb is a training to improve strength or self-control. Others defined it as an act of punishing. The latter is quite heavier. A misguided behavior needs an amount of discipline. But it should follow a certain process. And the word "process" means a particular course of action intended to achieve a result.
So, what are the course of action that should be followed in order to achieve a result when somebody has that unbecoming behavior? Allow me to put an emphasis on right and proper communication. How important is communication in settling an issue with somebody who violated the standards set forth by the authority? Consider this: A child will never understand why you suddenly spank him without even explaining to him the reason why. But, what if the child knows the reason? Won't you give him a chance to explain his side why he committed such an  act of misbehavior? Communication is a two-way process. We just cannot simply judge a person immediately with the way he behaves in our own point of view. We need to extend an ear for us to understand the reason behind his action.
Sometimes our judgment focus NOT on the issue but to the person himself. The way we perceive an individual affects our judgment. I can attest to that because I am a teacher who dealt with different kinds of students with unique attitudes. In as much as I want to be objective with my assessment, I couldn't help the fact that my assessment sometimes depends on how I perceive the students without even considering their upbringing as well as the kind of environment they live with. I am very much quick to judge the behavior of my students. I became BIAS with my assessment. If I will insist on assessing my student this way then I could be likened to a man whose clean sheet of a paper was blotted with an ink as big as a dot. His focus was no longer on the white area of the paper but rather, his attention was focus on that minute ink blot and so he crumpled the paper and put it in the waste basket. Wow, what a waste indeed!
 Again, this should not be the case. 





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