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Thursday, January 9, 2014

Cars Rule America for Now

Premier Mazda
Go to almost every European city, and everything you need is within walking distance. There is a corner grocery store that sells fresh foods and sundries. There is a restaurant within five blocks for those days when you don’t want to cook, and that restaurant often includes a bar if you want to be social. You may have to travel to the city for work, but that just means getting to the bus stop and waiting for a maximum of 15 minutes for the next bus. Mazda dealers in Kansas City know that Americans do not have such transportation conveniences. That makes owning a car a necessity until the public transportation infrastructure and perception is changed.

Style over Substance

At some point in the 1930s and 1940s, the United States decided to build highways all over the continent. It was great for connecting the vast countryside and for putting people to work. It was also great for the motor car and trucking industries. America could have chosen to put that money into public transportation like trains and subways, but it didn't. That decision has helped to create the reliance on fossil fuels and has restricted the freedom of movement to only those that can afford to own a car.

Winds of Change


While people are realizing that dependence on fossil fuels is a problem, the only thing that they can do to fix it at this point is to purchase a vehicle like ones that are sold at Mazda dealers in Kansas City that are fuel efficient. The government will need to decide to make public transportation a priority, and that will include getting it to run on time for any real change to happen. Until then, people will need to demand vehicles that are cheaper to operate, reliable, and that use the least amount of gas possible. Generally, this will mean smaller vehicles until a company comes out with an electric truck that is available to the public. The cultural shift toward public transportation is already happening as teens take longer to get their licenses. It is up to the government and the transportation industry to catch up.



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